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In the Press

  • Eight Christian counsellors will go on trial in Nepal this week in the first religious freedom case since the country's new constitution was implemented in 2015.

    The Christians were arrested for proselytising – outlawed in the new constitution – after distributing a pamphlet about Jesus in a Christian school while helping children through the trauma of last year's major earthquake in the country.

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  • The father of a Duluth middle school student who took his own life is suing the school district claiming it failed to protect his son from bullying that resulted in his death.

    Thirteen-year-old Tristan Seehus committed suicide in February of 2015. His father, Todd Seehus, says other students called his son a "freak" and shoved him into lockers at Lincoln Park Middle School because they mistakenly thought he was gay. It says the Duluth School District's failure to address the bullying amounted to discrimination. The complaint says the district ignored and diminished the abuse.

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  • Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys filed suit in federal court Tuesday against officials in the Vermont Board of Medical Practice and the Office of Professional Regulation on behalf of health care professionals who wish to abide by their oath to “do no harm.” The state agencies are construing Vermont’s assisted suicide law as requiring them, regardless of their conscience or oath, to counsel patients on doctor-prescribed death as an option.

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  • MENOPAUSE need not be the end of fertility. A team claims to have found a way to rejuvenate post-menopausal ovaries, enabling them to release fertile eggs, New Scientist can reveal.

    The team says its technique has restarted periods in menopausal women, including one who had not menstruated in five years. If the results hold up to wider scrutiny, the technique may boost declining fertility in older women, allow women with early menopause to get pregnant, and help stave off the detrimental health effects of menopause.

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  • The outspoken General Secretary of the Global Anglican Future Conference (GAFCON), a movement of orthodox Anglicans who have distanced themselves from liberally-driven mostly Western Anglican provinces, says pressure is being exerted within the Church of Ireland to change its teaching on sexual morality - in common with other Provinces in the British Isles - and, as a consequence, weaken her commitment to Biblical authority.

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  • [Editor’s note]: This short statement has just been released by a group of clergy and laity who, as members of General Synod, were present in the context in which the Shared Conversations took place. Some of the group did not take part in the Conversations on principle, having already decided that the process was flawed; the majority of those on the list did take part.

    It must be assumed that there were others who shared similar serious reservations about the Conversations having taken part, but who have not for whatever reason signed the list. Among them is Revd Dr Ian Paul, a member of Archbishop’s Council, who has written consistently to explain and defend the church’s historic teaching, and has strongly criticised the Conversations process here.

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  • Romania moved a step closer to ruling out the possibility of legalizing same-sex marriage on Wednesday when its top court paved the way for a referendum on defining marriage in the constitution as a union strictly between a man and a woman.

    The nine judges on the Constitutional Court ruled unanimously that a proposal signed by 3 million Romanians this year to change the constitution's definition of marriage was valid.

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  • A nursery worker has been struck off for calling a toddler a "terrorist" and saying “go away and bomb somewhere else".

    Nikki Alexander lost her job at Busy Bees nursery in Edinburgh for a catalogue of racist and physical abuse, and swearing at children all under the age of two.

    Read more.

  • Christians in Russia are now banned from discussing their faith outside of churches and other designated places under new anti-terror laws.

    From Wednesday onwards it is illegal to preach, teach or share faith outside state-controlled settings.

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  • Dsputes about where children of separated parents should live or how much time they spend with each parent could be resolved away from the daunting surroundings of a courtroom.

    The Family Law Arbitration Scheme, which began in 2012 to deal with financial matters, is to be extended to disputes concerning parental responsibility.

    Read more.

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