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In the Press

  • Prof Warwick, chief executive of the RCM, signed the country’s 30,000 midwives to a campaign to legalise abortion up to birth.

    Cathy Warwick, the chief executive of the Royal College of Midwives (RCM), will step down from the role and retire at the end of August 2017, it has been announced.

    Prof Warwick is also Chairman of Trustees for the British Pregnancy Advisory Service (BPAS), and came under fire when she signed the RCM up to their "We Trust Women Campaign", which advocates for full decriminalisation of abortion on demand up to birth.

    Read more.

  • Faith to Faithless, a community support network for 'apostates' and the ex-religious founded by Aliyah Saleem and Imtiaz Shams in 2015, is now a part of the British Humanist Association (BHA), the national charity working on behalf of non-religious people in the United Kingdom.

    BHA Chief Executive Andrew Copson commented, 'A brief look at the statistics — which show that two thirds of younger people in Britain are non-religious — can create the misleading impression that this new majority faces little hardship because of what they believe or don’t believe.

    'But look a little further, and you’ll find many non-religious people are discriminated against. Many who are treated this way are overlooked "minorities within minorities" who face rejection, victimisation, and abuse when they leave behind the religion they were raised in. As the national charity supporting the non-religious to live free and full lives, we are happy to take on the challenge of supporting ex-religious people either in crisis or in search of community. I’m delighted that we’ll soon be ready to offer that support much more widely through Faith to Faithless.'

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  • Worldwide abortion provider Marie Stopes International has been performing illegal abortions in Uganda, dumping the bodies of aborted babies in open sewers, and routinely concealing this practice from the U.S. foreign aid Agency USAID, according to a video released this week.

    The charges came to light in a chilling video, Killing Africa, from the London, England-based Culture of Life Africa organization.

    Desire Kirabo, a former MSI clinic staffer in Uganda, said in an interview by Culture of Life Africa founder and president Obianuju Ekeocha that "It was all about abortion," contrary to what she was told when hired in 2011 that the clinic provided "family planning."

    Read more.

  • Worldwide abortion provider Marie Stopes International has been performing illegal abortions in Uganda, dumping the bodies of aborted babies in open sewers, and routinely concealing this practice from the U.S. foreign aid Agency USAID, according to a video released this week.

    The charges came to light in a chilling video, Killing Africa, from the London, England-based Culture of Life Africa organization.

    Desire Kirabo, a former MSI clinic staffer in Uganda, said in an interview by Culture of Life Africa founder and president Obianuju Ekeocha that "It was all about abortion," contrary to what she was told when hired in 2011 that the clinic provided "family planning."

    Read more.

  • Merv and Nikki Kenward will travel to London in a bid to gain permission to overturn a High Court ruling regarding assisted suicide.

    In October 2014 Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders decided she would allow an amendment the 1961 Suicide Act.

    It clarified that prosecution should not to extend to outside professionals brought in to assist suicide after the victim has reached a settled decision to end his or her life.

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  • He faced criticism last year when his bill on school admissions did not deal with the ‘baptism barrier’ under which parents in some communities can not enrol their children in local primary schools unless they have been baptised in the Catholic church.

    Ahead of announcing a consultation on how to deal with the problem, he said this pressure to baptise their children is unfair. He wants members of the public and groups which might be affected to submit their views on a number of options before deciding how to proceed.

    While the desire of religious parents to educate their children in their faith should be respected, he said, non-religious parents or those of minority religions should not be unfairly disadvantaged when trying to get their children into local schools. 

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  • The head of the Scottish Episcopal Church says the Church is "deeply distressed" at the offence caused by the reading of a passage from the Koran in a Glasgow cathedral.

    The comments of the Church Primus, the Most Rev David Chillingworth, follow criticism that Islamic verses were read during an Epiphany service.

    In his blog, he also condemned the abuse received by St Mary's Cathedral.

    Police are investigating offensive online messages aimed at the church

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  • The Australian Christian Lobby (ACL) has claimed gender confusion will increase in the country if same-sex marriage is brought in.

    It's speaking as the Australian government's been urging people to provide them with their opinions on the introduction of same-sex marriage as part of their consultation. It was receiving responses up until Friday.

    The Australian coalition government wanted to hold a referendum where the people could decide whether same-sex marriage should be brought in, however this proposal was blocked by the Australian Senate.

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  • It was one of the bloodiest periods in English history, with thousands brutally put to death, often burned at the stake for their religious beliefs in the Reformation.

    But even though Henry VIII’s war with the Pope began 500 years ago, the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, is expected to express his remorse this week.

    The move was ridiculed by former Conservative Minister Ann Widdecombe, an Anglican who converted to Catholicism.

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  • Twelve of Britain’s most dangerous Islamist terrorists will be placed in containment units in three prisons at a cost of about £1m a year.

    Anjem Choudary — the country’s most notorious hate preacher, who was convicted last year of supporting Isis — is expected to be among the prisoners placed in the specialist units to prevent them from radicalising other inmates.

    Another high-profile ex­tremist to be separated from the general prison population is understood to be Michael Adebolajo, one of the two killers of the British soldier Lee Rigby in 2013. According to intelligence reports, Adebolajo has tried to exploit his notoriety in prison to recruit other Muslim convicts to the jihadist cause. 

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