Skip to content

Concern over 'Public Benefit' test of Christian Charities

Printer-friendly versionTHE Lawyers' Christian Fellowship is urging churches and Christian organisations to register their concern over the latest Government attempt to review the 'public benefit' of Christian charities.

Issued on behalf of the Lawyers' Christian Fellowship/Christian Concern for Our Nation (CCFON)

Press Release

For Immediate Release

12 June 2007

THE Lawyers' Christian Fellowship is urging churches and Christian organisations to register their concern over the latest Government attempt to review the 'public benefit' of Christian charities.

As part of a wide-sweeping upgrade of charity registration and management of charities by the Charity Commissioners, the Commission published a consultation document looking at whether charities which did not appear to meet a 'public benefit test' should lose their rights to Registered Charity status, including tax advantages through Gift Aid.

The LCF has submitted a response on behalf of churches and Christian charities which can be found at (http://www.christianconcernforournation.co.uk/Latest/docs/Charities.pdf)

Andrea Minichiello Williams, public policy officer at LCF said: "The Charities Act 2006 removed the legal presumption that charities established for the advancement of religion have purposes that are for the public benefit.

"‘Public benefit’ is not defined in the Charities Act 2006 and it has specifically been left to the Charity Commission to consult on the matter. Christian charities will now have to prove their ‘public benefit’ to the Charity Commission. It is of concern that the Charity Commission has said it will interpret ‘public benefit’ in the light of ‘modern conditions’. What this could mean for Christian charities that exist for evangelism or which promote traditional Christian teaching on family and life issues is unknown."

The Government proposal is that every charity will have to prove its 'public benefit' on an annual basis. Those who fail to persuade Civil Servants could be de-registered and lose out on taxable advantages, such as claiming tax back on donations given via Gift Aid.

Although the Consultation period ended on June 6, the LCF is encouraging church leaders and trustees of Christian organisations to write to the Charity Commission to demonstrate to depth of concern amongst Christian charities.

The address for the Charity Commission is: Charity Commission Direct,

PO Box 1227, Liverpool, L69 3UG, or email


ENDS.


For further information:


Andrea Minichiello Williams LCF Public Policy Officer: 0771 2591164;

Paul Eddy (PR) 01202 522177, 07932 019430.

Paul Eddy, FRSA
Director
Paul Eddy Public Relations Limited
Kavanagh House
25 Ridley Road
Bournemouth BH9 1LD
T:  01202 522177
E:
W: www.pepr.co.uk

Twitter

  • David Robertson recently wrote an open letter to Vicky Beeching. He shares his experience since then and what the… https://t.co/5n2lVGA9dZ 21 hours 24 min ago
  • Previously 'locked-in' boy tells his story: https://t.co/OvuF5TO65W Jonathan Bryan, a 12-year-old, spent the first… https://t.co/dpIsA0vDlZ 1 day 20 hours ago
  • Radio interview on the New Normal. Dr Robert Lopez, a contributor to The New Normal, spoke to a Detroit radio stat… https://t.co/iBlGMzI8UG 2 days 4 hours ago
  • University fires chaplain for anti-Pride church service, even though his service was held off university premises a… https://t.co/lkahPEHc7v 2 days 18 hours ago
  • We're seeking an energetic and organised Events Officer to help deliver high quality events, as we serve and equip… https://t.co/shjG7iIu4b 4 days 19 hours ago

Subscribe to our emails